Monthly Archives: August 2009

My University’s Library Actually Listened to Me

Months ago I submitted a request on the library’s website to purchase a copy of James Crossley‘s  Why Christianity Happened: A Sociohistorical Account of Christian Origins (26-50CE) and they did! I feel so empowered.

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Moises Silva and the Πιστις Χριστου debate

Please go read what Esteban has posted by Moises Silva on the πιστις χριστου debate.

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Maurice Robinson and the Case for Byzantine Priority

I have posted this link on my old blog, but I wanted to post it again in case I’ve actually gained a few new readers who are unfamiliar with Dr. Robinson’s work. Before I say anything, let me go ahead and post the text from his second point in the introduction and its corresponding footnote:

Certainly the Textus Receptus had its problems, not the least of which was its failure to reflect the Byzantine Textform in an accurate manner. But the Byzantine Textform is not the TR, nor need it be associated with the TR or those defending such in any manner. (2)

(2)This includes all the various factions which hope to find authority and certainty in a single “providentially preserved” Greek text or English translation (usually the KJV). It need hardly be mentioned that such an approach has nothing to do with actual text-critical theory or praxis. (Emphasis his)

Robinson’s argumentation is convincing to me, though I’d like to hear what his opponents say concerning this particular essay.

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Review: Adrian Fortescue’s “The Early Papacy”

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The Early Papacy to the Synod of Chalcedon in 451

  • Paperback: 121 pages
  • Publisher: Ignatius Press; 4 edition (March 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586171763
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586171766
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    Adrian Fortescue was a scholar of Theology and Patristics in the late 19th/early 20th Century. His other works include The Greek Fathers: Their Lives and Writings and The Ceremonies of the Roman Rite Explained. The Early Papacy seems to be a response to Anglicans who had voiced objections that the Papacy was a 5th Century invention. To answer these claims, Fortescue marshalls evidence for the Papacy from the first to the 5th Centuries, with the Council of Chalcedon as his cut-off date. He has four points that he hopes to prove from the Patristic evidence: 1) The Pope as Chief (ch 4), 2) The Pope’s universal jurisdiction (ch 5), 3) Communion with Rome is necessary (ch 6), and finally 4) Papal infallibility (ch 7).

    His opening chapters deal with defining how and why Catholics believe these claims today. He writes:

    We believe in a Church that exists and lives all days, even to the end of the world, guided by Christ, infallible in faith and morals as long as she exists. We have exactly the same confidence in the divine guidance of the Church in 1870 as in 451. To be obliged to hark back some fifteen hundred years, to judge for yourself, according to the measure of your scholarship, what the documents of that period imply, would be the end of any confidence in a living authority. (21-22)

    That is, to Fortescue, this is almost an unnecessary endeavor because the Church today has declared these things to be true. However, he believes that this is such an easy belief to prove from antiquity that it’s a worthwhile venture.

    I won’t go through all of his examples and ruin the fun of reading the book. The more fascinating things he addresses, if briefly, are Denis of Alexandria coming to Denis of Rome after being suspected of false doctrine (70), Athanasius’ appeal to Rome, the canons of the synod at Sardicia (c. 344, p 73), and so forth. Because the book is less than 150 pages, this is a very easy read and I’d certainly recommend it as an intro to Patristic thought on the papacy.

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    Received in the mail: Mike Aquilina’s “Signs and Mysteries”

    I’m very very happy to have gotten this book. I’ve been meaning to read it since it came out, having read several of other Mr. Aquilina’s books (The Fathers of the Church and The Mass of the Early Christians) I know that I’m in for a treat. He also has a great bibliography for anyone interested in the Fathers.

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    The Locative in Homer and The Life of Brian

    We are translating Homer’s Odyssey in my Greek class. We’ve begun book 1 and we came across something that I’ve not encountered in Sophocles’ Antigone (which I translated last semester) nor the New Testament or the few Fathers I’ve read in Greek : the locative. I realize that Latin utilizes the locative, but I had not realized that Greek had this as well. I thought everyone just used the dative of place, but Homer likes to have things his way. Because Classicists are nerds (as most, if not all, Biblical scholars are), we watched this short clip from Life of Brian today to see the locative in action in Latin:

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    Mark Goodacre vs. the Greatest Preacher Who has Ever Lived

    Mark Goodacre recently did a podcast on the number of the beast mentioned in Revelation 13:18. But, I don’t think he has anything on this guy:

    See? You’ve got Scripture, you’ve got Math – what else are you looking for? Repent, NIV users!

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